Round and Round the Mulberry Bush

  Imagery provided by Joanne Theaker

Imagery provided by Joanne Theaker

Individual’s performance is consistently being damaged by a culture characterised by survival mode thinking.   This form of (black and white) thinking is characterised narrow organisational objectives that lack wider social and environmental context, a complete lack of transparency in every aspect of organisation, role rigidity and hierarchy (simplistic power structures), narrow quantity focussed performance measurement, high levels of performance related stress, competitive win lose focus.  This culture inevitably reflects the mindset of those who are often lauded as the high performance individuals and who are often holding the senior positions of organisations.   Once in position they are almost impossible to move and are totally blind to the damage they do profoundly rooting themselves in the belief that, as a long as by the measurements that arise from the characteristics of their own thinking, they out perform their peers in other organisations, they are succeeding.   However religiously we may feel that this form of thinking has driven the successful development of modern society to date it is possible to argue that our future performance and potential is now being deeply severely limited and harmed.   With a tendency to undermine, human potential, due to creating a stress based culture, black and white narrow-minded thinking will prevail at all levels of society and solutions to the world’s problems will seem unobtainable.    Nothing has come to characterise this narrow form of thinking more than the monetary system of debt and interest, which is the ubiquitous glue determining the nature of so much social interaction.   High performing individuals have become attracted to the world of financial services in their droves as it naturally allows then to give full play to their own modes of thought.   By 2013 financial services accounted for 9.6 per cent of the UK’s national output in 2011 up from 9.4 per cent in 2010.  Together with the 4.9 per cent of GDP contributed by professional services in both years, the sectors make up around 14.5 per cent of the UK’s GDP, despite only employing around seven per cent of the country’s workers.  Furthermore of these 2,058,500 employees, some 663,600 are stationed in London, making up 15 per cent of the capital’s total employment. After London comes Manchester, employing 50,200, Edinburgh, with 49,200, and in fourth Birmingham, where 49,200 workers are employed in financial or professional services.  And as well as generating output and employment, financial and professional services are churning out cash for the exchequer.  The City pumped £63bn into the government’s coffers in the 2011-12-tax year, maintaining its input in spite of the slide back into double-dip recession – though strong revenues elsewhere meant this was a reduced fraction of the total – 11.6 per cent instead of 12.1 per cent.  Of this £63bn total, £21.4bn came from financial services employees’ income tax payments, together making up some 15 per cent of income tax revenues – despite coming from just four per cent of the UK’s workers.   Should we be relieved to hear that our economic future is now so dependent on financial services or are we not going “round the mulberry bush” one more time, following our “leaders”?